February Posts Outside the Service Area: Paramedic Refresher

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I have nearly completed the requirements for my paramedic refresher which has included health care provider certification, ACLS certification, PALS certification, classroom lectures, skill labs, and patient simulators. In addition I have been looking for articles and books on topics I want to learn more.

While answering a patient scenario question about OB emergencies for my paramedic refresher I came across this post, Anatomy of an Unsafe Abortion. This is a powerfully written post from Dr. Jen Gunter. When I read cases and news accounts about patient emergencies I often try to image how I would have responded as a paramedic. Imagine if you found this patient dropped in front of your station or responded to her home. What would your treatment have been? Where would you have transported her? Would your emotions and beliefs about abortion affected your response or your post incident recovery?

An area that I have really focused on for this refresher cycle is strengthening my 12 Lead ECG interpretation skills. I have re-read a couple of paramedic textbook chapters, read lots of posts in the 12 lead ECG blog archives, and found several blogs that are related to the athletic heart. I found this post at the EMSED4U blog to be especially interesting. Click here for part 1 of 88 y/o male with ALOC and then read part 2.

With my combined interest in fitness, endurance sports, and medicine I recently stumbled upon the blog of Dr. John M. and found is very informative post and links to many other posts on Atrial Fibrillation. This follow-up post has a great image of a dual chamber defibrillator recording which really helped me understand what is going in A-Fib,

Our paramedic refresher course has included 3 face to face sessions. Most of the other paramedics I have never met before. By and large I have been impressed with their knowledge and inquiry to learn more. As I interact with the other medics I find myself wondering about their “bedside manner” and if how they interact with peers is similar to how they might interact with a patient or a worried family member. Steve Whitehead offers a powerful reminder that no one and no organization tells us to care. No authority can make you have compassion. It is up to you. Read No One Can Care for You. Can your patients and co-workers tell you care?